Patent ductus arteriosus echocardiography

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor-In-Chief: Priyamvada Singh, M.B.B.S. [2], Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [3], Assistant Editor-In-Chief: Kristin Feeney, B.S. [4]

Overview

Echocardiogram is the non-invasive method and can diagnose patent ductus arteriosus. Echo along with doppler can be used to visualize the shunt from the aorta to the left pulmonary artery.

Echocardiography

The PDA can usually be visualized on two-dimensional echocardiography, showing left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) enlargement. It can also be assessed by doppler and color flow imaging, establishing the diagnosis and distension of a small nonpulmonary hypertensive ductus from a coronary arteriovenous fistula to the pulmonary artery. Doppler shows the presence of a continuous flow into the left PA and main PA trunk. The maximum acceleration of the blood flow is in late systole and early diastole. In the adult, doppler can be used to visualize the shunt from the aorta to the left pulmonary artery. PDAs can be seen on:

  • Suprasternal view
  • High pasasternal short-axis view: aim probe leftward/superior
  • Transesophageal echocardiogram (often needed in adults to accurately visualize a PDA)

Functions

  • Estimate the magnitude of the shunt.
  • Degree of left ventricular and left atrial dilation.
  • Calculation of the peak pressure gradient in the PDA can be calculated with the modified Bernoulli equation.
  • Associated anomalities
PDA.jpg

Shown below is an echocardiogram of a stented persisting ductus arteriosus. One can see the aortic arch and the stent leaving.

An echocardiogram of a stented persisting ductus arteriosus. One can see the aortic arch and the stent leaving.

Shown below is an echocardiogram of a coiled persisting ductus arteriosus. One can see the aortic arch,the pulmonary artery and the coil between them.

An echocardiogram of a coiled persisting ductus arteriosus. One can see the aortic arch,the pulmonary artery and the coil between them.

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